• Wednesday, September 03, 2014

Book Reviews

Published Date: September 1, 2014
A landscape of ideas

A landscape of ideas

A Perspective of Dynamic Resilience, Dr. Abdul Matin, Palok Publishers MANY of us have had the pleasure of following Dr. Abdul Matin's views on various issues through his opinion columns published in different national newspapers. A nuclear physicist and an electrical engineer, he is best known for his articles on nuclear energy and effective electrical power system planning. He has also written on different national issues, including aspects of science and technology, economics, politics and the paradigm of climate change. While doing so, consistent with his training as a scientist, he has always tried to objectively analyse the subject under review on the basis of available facts and figures. Impartiality, non-politicization and pragmatism have...

Published Date: September 1, 2014
The little reasons for joy

The little reasons for joy

14,000 things to be happy about, Barbara Ann Kipper, Workman Publishing, NY THE title of the book would suggest a really long book review. How can you write about 14,000 things to be happy about without using thousands of words? But the author, Barbara Ann Kipper, has written about the blessings in her life with a straight list, in a cute little book. It's like driving the nail straight home, no beating about the bush about how each one of us has the eyes to observe the world with. Although she gives a number for happy things, to the reader happiness goes far beyond them. When one reads the list of ordinary...

Published Date: September 1, 2014
The man before the controversies came

The man before the controversies came

Strictly Personal, Manmohan and Gursharan, Daman Singh, HarperCollins IN the crowd and cacophony of controversies set off by tell-all books on some of India's top politicians since the run-up to the Indian parliamentary elections, a new book on former Prime Minister Manmohan Singh by his daughter Daman Singh, an author who is engaged in rural development work, stands out easily for two principal reasons. First, it chronicles the journey of a man from a non-descript village named Gah (now in Pakistan), who rose to become a key economist-bureaucrat and finance minister, set India off on the path of economic reforms and liberalization before making his way to the top executive post—prime minister—and remaining...

Published Date: September 1, 2014
Partly nostalgia, partly agony…

Partly nostalgia, partly agony…

Nodir Naam Dushshomoy, Mashuk Chowdhury, Shahosh Publications TWO or three years back, I was intensely engrossed with the poetry of some contemporary young poets such as Obayed Akash, Binoy Barman, Mujib Erom and so on. Consequently I reviewed several books by some of them. Truly speaking, I got attracted to our contemporary short stories as well Latin American literature. Sometime ago, I came by a collection of poetry, Nodir Nam Dushshomoy, by Mashuk Chowdhury. Allow me to jot down some words regarding Mashuk Chowdhury. A poet of the 1970s, he invariably tries to keep himself far away from our known poets' circles.  Which is why very few of us have had the opportunity...