• Thursday, March 05, 2015

Health

Published Date: March 1, 2015
WHO calls for worldwide use of smart syringe

WHO calls for worldwide use of smart syringe

Use of the same syringe or needle to give injections to more than one person is driving the spread of a number of deadly infectious diseases worldwide. Millions of people could be protected from infections acquired through unsafe injections if all healthcare programmes switched to syringes that cannot be used more than once....

Published Date: March 1, 2015
Nutritional care for Breast cancer patient

Breast cancer is sometimes called the rich woman's disease, because only women who can afford to eat a diet high in red meat and dairy usually get breast cancer. Researchers have discovered a link between the disease and eating too much fat. They estimate that we may be able to prevent as many as 9% cases by changing our diet. Smart nutrition and a diet that keeps you at a healthy weight can help reduce your risk of breast cancer....

Have A Nice Day

Published Date: March 1, 2015
Mother of all milks

Milk, the most ideal food — was the mantra — we have been hearing since our childhood. But does the great popularity of cow's milk signify that it is really the best? Well, before that we must admit that all humans have been created to be sustained entirely upon mothers' milk for at least the first six months of life. There is no other food in the world better than mothers' milk. However, we need to remember that all other milk...

Health Bulletin

Published Date: March 1, 2015
Cut music to 'an hour a day'

Cut music to 'an hour a day'

People should listen to music for no more than one hour a day to protect their hearing, the World Health Organisation (WHO) suggests. It says 1.1 billion teenagers and young adults are at risk of permanently damaging their hearing by listening to "too much, too loudly".

Health Bulletin

Published Date: March 1, 2015
Risk factors for heartburn: excess weight, smoking

Excess pounds and smoking might each raise the likelihood of frequent heartburn or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to a large study from Norway published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology. Other factors linked to higher odds of new GERD symptoms included getting older, being a woman, having less education, and even quitting smoking – if it led to weight gain.